Mike Perry, coming soon to Outdoorz Gallery

Graphic designer and illustrator Mike Perry will be adding his touch to Outdoorz Gallery. Original hand applied drawings by Mike on the famous Eames chair. A great combination of classic design and contemporary graphics- coming soon !  More about Mike......

The Man with the Pen

Text: Katharina Altemeier Katharina.Altemeier@form.de

 Designs by Mike Perry from Brooklyn, bear his signature in the true sense of the word. Whenever possible, the 27-year-old graphic designer does without a computer and draws logos and illustrations by pencil and paintbrush. Mike Perry believes in the charm of handmade design. His second book on the subject has just been published: In “Over & Over” Perry has brought together the like-minded who – like himself – design their works by hand. A portrait.
 
To say you are designer out of passion sounds inflated, clichéd, and pretty stereotype. But when Mike Perry explains why he became a graphic designer it sounds likable and convincing – not least of all because of his youthful freshness. “Some people do things because they can, not because they have to,” he says. “I definitely have a ‘have to’ thing going on”, says Perry about himself. The 27-year-old works primarily as an illustrator for various fashion, music and lifestyle magazines but is also a typographer and art director. After spending a few years in his early 20s in the creative department of the US fashion chain Urban Outfitters in Philadelphia, Perry has been self-employed with his own studio in Brooklyn, New York for two years now. Here, among other things, he designed logos for the architecture magazine “Dwell” and for The School at Columbia which is part of Columbia University. He also designs CD covers, typography for Brooklyn Industry T-shirts, illustrates fashion spreads for the Style section of the “New York Times” and publishes his own magazine “Untitled.”


Following “Hand Job,” his second book “Over & Over” has now been published by Princeton Architectural Press. Perry curated both books, meaning he chose all the projects presented in them. While “Hand Job” introduces hand drawn typography by various graphic designers, “Over & Over” has accumulated pattern designs by more than 50 designers, the large majority of whom Mike Perry knows personally. There is a reason why the books are devoted to designing by hand, and this is because Perry himself also draws, paints or prints logos, fonts and illustrations without resorting to digital tools wherever possible. “For me, things designed by hand always have something magic about them because you can recognize the person behind them,” says Perry. “When everyone draws the same object the results are completely different. The way someone draws a line or designs an image speaks volumes and also delivers, so to speak, an interpretation of the object which could never be created digitally.” The fact that he draws and paints 
by hand whenever he can, contributes considerably to the authentic look of his design. They are perfectly imperfect, in part appear childishly naive, are very detailed, playful and often extremely humorous, like Perry himself.